Employment

Despite Notable Improvement, California Metro Areas Still Face Unemployment Challenges


The Golden State is home to the two metro areas posting the greatest decline in unemployment rates among large metro areas in April 2013, compared to a year earlier. The unemployment rate fell by an even two percentage points in both the Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario and the Sacramento-Arden-Arcade-Roseville metro areas, according to data released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics in its monthly Metro Area Employment and Unemployment Summary.

El Centro, California experienced the largest year-over-year unemployment decrease (-3.9 percent) among all metro areas – yet still carries the dubious distinction of being one of the two highest unemployment rates in the nation, at 24.0 percent. Yuma, Arizona posted the highest unemployment rate (30.3 percent) in April.

Despite its notable decline,  the Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario metro area was tied with the Las Vegas-Paradise metro area for the having the highest unemployment rate (9.6 percent) among large metro areas.

Midland, Texas posted the lowest unemployment rate (3.0 percent) in April. The Oklahoma City metro area had the lowest unemployment rate (4.1 percent) among large metro areas.

According to the BLS, 213 metro areas had unemployment rates below the national rate (7.1 percent), 153 metro areas had unemployment rates above it, and six had rates equal to it.

On the employment side, 274 metro areas posted increases in non-farm payroll employment, 88 metro areas had decreases, and 10 were unchanged.

How did your metro area fare in April? See MuniNetGuide’s Employment and Unemployment Trends index, which lists metro areas by state.

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